EXHIBITIONS

 

UPCOMING

ARCHIVE

 

 

Kunsthall 3.14 is proud to present «Irresistible Earth» by Rina Banerjee and «Green Drawings, I Pledge» by Nina Slejko Blom and  Conny Blom. In this autumn's first exhibition period, we will have the opportunity to be captivated by works that convey the hope and belief that we will bring about changes for the better for both humans and the earth and be able to feel the joy of giving and receiving by making a pledge with personal contributions aimed towards the climate fight. We can choose to take positive steps and take responsibility for our own and society's attitudes, culture and actions.

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| EXHIBITION HALL |

Rina Banerjee

"Irresistible Earth, an uncontrollable and unconditional love is bestowed to us upon birth while ours is love for her, Nature that grows like ripening fruit both fermented and fresh drives our ambition to expand and all the while a universe seemingly cooling and heating like sour tongue airing, widening, making our earth to move away from sun, it’s migrating destiny unknown, drifting outward to echo voiceless Nature, a wisdom for you and I to draw out, like tight curled tongue. Why is hers, her nature and our nature too so coupled but loose, coiled and tangled with tails, horns and unclipped nails, messy and monstrous parts these her humans drizzles fortune and violence untasted into time. Why would you not open your mouth and allow your scent to swell over, your senses to identify this tooled mind, to let see right from wrong? Earth, a watery cradle held me newborn, allowed me to play with Nature, like school friends, will she now not protect me from your other creations as you would Love or a sunny day from grey."

03.09.- 31.10.2021

Opening Friday September 3rd, 18:00-20:00

Rina Banerjee forms a lengthy, intriguing, and poetic exhibition title and it reads as follow: Irresistible Earth, an uncontrollable and unconditional love is bestowed to us upon birth while ours is love for her, Nature that grows like ripening fruit both fermented and fresh drives our ambition to expand and all the while a universe seemingly cooling and heating like sour tongue airing, widening, making our earth to move away from sun, it's migrating destiny unknown, drifting outward to echo voiceless Nature, a wisdom for you and I to draw out, like tight curled tongue. Why is hers, her nature and our nature too so coupled but loose, coiled and tangled with tails, horns and unclipped nails, messy and monstrous parts these her humans drizzles fortune and violence untasted into time. Why would you not open your mouth and allow your scent to swell over, your senses to identify this tooled mind, to let see right from wrong? Earth, a watery cradle held me newborn, allowed me to play with Nature, like school friends, will she now not protect me from your other creations as you would Love or a sunny day from grey The free spirited sentence structures offer us an out-of-the-ordinary entrance into her work. Banerjee´s play with words propagates within her visual universe, the play contributing to our perception of the spontaneous forms of expression. In play we might find our holistic nature and have the best opportunity to grow into perfect, free, and autonomous people. Our nature is being harmonized and humanized.
 

Banerjee makes a visual stance for the need to first acknowledge then to abandon the world as we know it with its masculine-dominated ideas that women and nature exist to be controlled. The assemblages, paintings, and drawings present themselves simultaneously as familiar and unfamiliar. Banerjee´s riotous use of color, assemblages, and discordant materials, make the work fascinating and challenging at the same time. As in nature desires, nature requires, nature transforms… She approaches her desire for change with optimism, hopefulness, and confidence, more like a botanist’s slow unfolding of the silky texture of a flower, or an entomologist’s cautious examination of all the wonders of a bumblebee´s sting and wings, and less like the violence of nonconsensual domination some scientists impose when unwrapping nature’s beautiful web, taking away its charm, and hunting it down to its most elemental form.

Through the ages, religious leaders, politicians, and scientists have all associated women with nature, although they have not agreed on the nature, origin, and purpose of women. Regardless, they found a common denominator in legitimizing male domination of nature and bestowed to them the power and the right to govern. This gendered hierarchy has been supported by medical science dictionaries: the uterus epitomizing feminine organization, thus reducing women to their childbearing function. Between menstruation and pregnancy, puberty and menopause, women were perpetually ill; men were therefore naturally and irremediably superior. This conclusion was to be confirmed by psychiatry and psychoanalysis from its conception, for it identified a connection between the nature and mental instability of women, who, unable to control their emotions, were rendered incapable of making proper use of reason. Reason must obey nature, which ordered the world, and intended the private sphere for women and the public sphere for men. This reasoning made its way from nature to the nature of women, which was to be deemed weak and fragile, feeding into the construct of a gender divide that was shared across most cultures and codified in civil rules.

Maybe, first, we can finally find a way forward and achieve gender neutrality by transcending the gendering of nature. Banerjee explores and challenges the way we look upon women and talk about nature. When misogyny is rampant on a dying planet, female gender in the natural world is counterproductive. When equating the scientific violation of nature with the rape of women, it unfortunately does not arouse much sympathy. It rather shows that upholding the natural gender “woman” will only extend gender-based violence towards the planet and nature as a “woman”. The phrase "she is dying" is usually used to talk about the state of our planet. Saying “she is dying” does not arouse enough of people's sympathy for the detained women and children at the southern U.S. border whose lives are in danger due to inadequate safety conditions. "She is dying" does not aid adequately the thousands of women who die every year as a result of domestic violence. "She is dying" does not help sufficiently to prevent maternal deaths caused by the government's refusal to grant women the option of safe abortions. If saying "she is dying" doesn't affect action from those in power, then telling them that actual women are dying has little effect on getting them to care about the planet. According to those in position of power whose personal gain would not increase if she were to be saved, "she is dying" is merly of a statement of fact than a call to action.

This gendering of nature connects our current climate crisis with the scientific thinking of yesteryear. It is not surprising that more and more studies today link gender reactionaries with climate denialism. Even in the Nordic countries the majority of male climate skeptics view climate advocates as a threat to modern industrial society, reflecting their masculinity—a person who has the right to exploit nature. Driven by the idolization of an economic system that reveres exploitation and domination, male reactionaries view eco-consciousness and a general concern for the earth as the feminization of their world. As the main providers of food, water, and fuel in extensive part of the world, women bear the greater burden of the global-warming crisis, but they are also more vulnerable when flooding and drought occur. The U.N. estimates 80% of those displaced by climate change are women and their children. We must all acknowledge the worldwide need to further empower women, especially in the current climate of decision-making.

 

New York-based Indian artist Rina Banerjee (1963) is renowned for exploring overlapping themes that coincide with important issues of our time: colonialism and globalism; immigration and identity; gender and sexuality; climate change and the natural world. She is currently featured in an extensive museum tour in the US with a large in-depth exploration of her artistic endeavors in the exhibition Make Me a Summary of the World.

[rinabanerjee.com/home.html]

Courtesy of Galerie Nathalie Obadia, Paris, France.

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| VAULT |

Nina Slejko Blom & Conny Blom

"The Green Drawings - I Pledge"

03.09.- 31.10.2021

Opening Friday September 3rd, 18:00-20:00

Green for money, green for greed, green for nature, green for green deeds.

In this latest iteration of the project, Nina Slejko Blom & Conny Blom are once more swapping drawings for environmental pledges—albeit this time the drawings are bigger and framed, as becomes the setting of a former bank vault in one of the richest countries in the world. The Norwegian oil and gas industry has over the years provided large oil revenues. They have provided prosperity and high consumption, which in itself leads to emissions. In this way, Norway has contributed to climate-related destruction both here at home and around the world. Norway has a moral obligation to take a leading role in accordance with the Climate Convention and the Paris Agreement.

 

The drawings in the exhibition appear to be for free, but accepting a gift always comes with a price.
And the bigger the gift, the bigger the debt.

 

So let's talk about what we are willing to give. Many of us have grown up with a consumer culture and learned to let ourselves be dazzled by greed. Flight-shame and meat-shame are newer terms and good examples of the trend of turning responsibility for the climate catastrophe against ourselves. Collective guilt is becoming increasingly important. Dostoevsky put it pointedly: "make yourself responsible for all men's sins. As soon as you make yourself responsible in all sincerity for everything and for everyone, you will see at once that this is really so, and that you are in fact to blame for everyone and for all things.” We must all be aware of our responsibilities, both through the pattern of our consumption and the voice we give to elected politicians who pursue insufficient climate policies.

In parallel, we see an emerging tendency for the placement of guilt to be turned outwards towards politicians and top leaders; it is just a matter of time before they are held responsible for climate crimes against humanity. Don't you think we should make our politicians face up to the fact that eternal economical growth is incompatible with stopping the climate crisis? Why don't they regulate industries to ensure sustainability? In addition to teaching us responsible consumerism (read: individual guilt), should our countries not emphasize a ban on enterprises that are effecting the climate negatively when a more sustainable option is available, and hold the top leaders in charge of those activities personally liable through their active of passive actions for the damages inflicted on our globe?


And what thoughts do we make in relation to a state that will moderate our diets and energy consumption? Are we willing to drive cars just twice a week, fly a limited amount of miles, enjoy electricity-free evenings, and eat rationed food?

 

The bigger the gift, the bigger the profit.

 

If you desire a drawing, use the form provided to tell us about your plans to help stave off climate change and replace one drawing on the wall with this form.

Nina Slejko Blom (b. 1982, Slovenia) is an international contemporary artist currently based in Sweden. She is a post-studio artist, often examining the art world and its institutions, and various other power structures in her work.

[www.ninaslejko.com]


In his artistic practice, Conny Blom (b. 1974, Sweden) works in many different media and frequently examines hierarchies and reveals alternative readings by remediating pre-existing material. Censorship and copyright are two topics that he has often returned to through the years.


Working both separately and in a team, they have made over 300 exhibitions at relevant institutions around the world.

[connyblom.com/artprojects]

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| PARABOL |

Little Queer Lullaby / Mor Efrony, Listening to a Moonquake

03.09.- 31.10.2021

Opening Friday September 3rd, 18:00-20:00

Curated by Lydgalleriet

(((O)))


Once upon a time they were she
And she is a Multi Orgasmic creature
Each and every O was rippling the sky
Each and every O is rippling the night


Each and every O energizing her
Each and every O nurturing the earth
And she is a Multi Orgasmic creature
Each and every O ripples beyond the periphery of her skin


And she was just ripe
She is ripe so
Come
Play
Come play with
Come

Little Queer Lullaby – sound piece for the Parabol project at the exhibition Irresistible Earth.
The composition made for a parabolic speaker was recorded in an instant womb-like acoustic set up made of wood, Tibetan bells, Indian bells (tarlam) and an oud.


The remixed sitar part was recorded through the project Dreamwaves/ Concert for a Sleeping Conductor.
A live feedback loop concert in which the visualized breathing of a sleeping audience became a conducting tool.


Mor Efrony is an Oslo based artist and dj with an international background.
She is focused on painting, sculpture, sound, gender, nature, migration, love and well-being.
Little Queer Lullaby is a glimpse from her new project Listening to a Moonquake that will showcase at Galleri BOA and Bærum Kunsthall in 2022.


Sweet Spot Sensors and Program – Sagar Sen, Sitar – Mor Efrony.
Captured by Nina Krogh.